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(Masnavi Book 1: 01) Proem






PROEM

IN THE NAME OF GOD THE MERCIFUL, THE COMPASSIONATE

1. Listen to the reed how it tells a tale, complaining of separations
Saying, “Ever since I was parted from the reed-bed, my lament hath caused man and woman to moan.
I want a bosom torn by severance, that I may unfold (to such a one) the pain of love-desire.
Every one who is left far from his source wishes back the time when he was united with it.

5. In every company I uttered my wailful notes, I consorted with the unhappy and with them that rejoice.
Every one became my friend from his own opinion; none sought out my secrets from within me.
My secret is not far from my plaint, but ear and eye lack the light (whereby it should be apprehended).
Body is not veiled from soul, nor soul from body, yet none is permitted to see the soul.
This noise of the reed is fire, it is not wind: whoso hath not this fire, may he be naught!

10. ’Tis the fire of Love that is in the reed, ’tis the fervour of Love that is in the wine.
The reed is the comrade of every one who has been parted from a friend: its strains pierced our hearts.
Who ever saw a poison and antidote like the reed? Who ever saw a sympathiser and a longing lover like the reed?
The reed tells of the Way full of blood and recounts stories of the passion of Majnún.
Only to the senseless is this sense confided: the tongue hath no customer save the ear.

15. In our woe the days (of life) have become untimely: our days travel hand in hand with burning griefs.
If our days are gone, let them go!—’tis no matter. Do Thou remain, for none is holy as Thou art!
Whoever is not a fish becomes sated with His water; whoever is without daily bread finds the day long.
None that is raw understands the state of the ripe: therefore my words must be brief. Farewell!
O son, burst thy chains and be free! How long wilt thou be a bondsman to silver and gold?

20. If thou pour the sea into a pitcher, how much will it hold? One day's store.
The pitcher, the eye of the covetous, never becomes full: the oyster-shell is not filled with pearls until it is contented.
He (alone) whose garment is rent by a (mighty) love is purged of covetousness and all defect.
Hail, O Love that bringest us good gain—thou that art the physician of all our ills,
The remedy of our pride and vainglory, our Plato and our Galen!

25. Through Love the earthly body soared to the skies: the mountain began to dance and became nimble.
Love inspired Mount Sinai, O lover, (so that) Sinai (was made) drunken and Moses fell in a swoon.
Were I joined to the lip of one in accord with me, I too, like the reed, would tell all that may be told;
(But) whoever is parted from one who speaks his language becomes dumb, though he have a hundred songs.
When the rose is gone and the garden faded, thou wilt hear no more the nightingale's story.

30. The Beloved is all and the lover (but) a veil; the Beloved is living and the lover a dead thing.
When Love hath no care for him, he is left as a bird without wings. Alas for him then!
How should I have consciousness (of aught) before or behind when the light of my Beloved is not before me and behind?
Love wills that this Word should be shown forth: if the mirror does not reflect, how is that?
Dost thou know why the mirror (of thy soul) reflects nothing? Because the rust is not cleared from its face.

**Nicholson's Translation ends here, remaining part is taken from Gupta's translation

34a. the mirror which is clear of that rust and has no dust of desire
etc. on it, ever reflects the light of the Supreme Sun (which
sustains all the lower solar systems).

34b. O brother! Go and cleanse the mirror of your heart of all the
rust of desire and then bathe in the effulgence of the light of God
which it is bound to reflect.

34c. Listen to this counsel by the ear of your soul so that you may
go out of this prison-house of earth and water.

34d. If you have even a grain of intelligence, give way to spirit;
only then you can be qualified to undertake the spiritual journey.
(First, get acquainted with the path; then alone your journey can be
negotiated without any let or hindrance.)

15 comments:

Tayyab said...

Great!
After Iqbal Blog You people started Rumi Blog...
Really Great Work...
Much Appreciated..

- Tayyab

saqi_pak said...

Assalam o Alikum.
Great effort. including "Kaleed e Masnavi" of Moulana Ashraf Ali Thanvi shall make it perfect.

Anonymous said...

very good

Anonymous said...

great to see Rumi translated into urdu. its tragic that Pakistani nation has abandoned Farsi and lost teachings of great thinkers like Rumi,Hafiz Shirazi,Saadi,Jami,Neshapuri and many more.Its tragic.how can you study Iqbal if you have not studied Rumi and Shirazi. Also a nation will remain intellectually dwarf if they just rely on couple of thinkers and discard rest of extraordinary people.i want Farsi back into schools.It will connect us with our Muslim civilisation and will give us badly needed identity.Otherwise Pakistan will merge into India or will remain child of India.

Anonymous said...

Asalam-u-Aliekum,
Good Work
Shah Jahan

Adeel Irshad said...

I want to ask the administrator of this website to grant us some drops from the ocean of Attar as well. Please translate his poetry from Persian into Urdu as well. I have been trying to find his Book " The Conference of Birds" with Persian verses and Urdu translation. I have not found it. I request you to translate his poetry into Urdu as well. Thank you very much.

Anonymous said...

jis kitaab se ye pages upload kiye gye hain uska naaam kia hai?
what is the name of book from which these pages are taken?
please email @: aliabbas9@hotmail.com

Anonymous said...

great...

sarwataj said...

زبردست کام

Anonymous said...

salam alikum this is mohammad Khalid kakar ,i just want to say thanks and have to say this words mulana jalaluddin mohammad balkhi he is the God of poetry its not easy for you Guy's to translate is be care full

Abbasi Muhammad said...

good

Umm-e- Sharmeen said...

great
god work this all stuff was lost in the history and you guys brought it back.

Unknown said...

Great effort---- I have studied Iqbal but Roomi was difficult to understand. Your work has helped me a lot. Please continue it.

Anonymous said...

First page image is broken...

Muhammad Khan said...

we have been benefited and enjoying reading Masnavi The great book of the great sufi Roomi we love him very much he is a becon of light for us.Your translations and work is Excellent Keep it up jazakillah may Almighty keep us safe from evils eyes and bless you health walth both of spititual and material, deen u dunia ma surkh roo karay give you more courage to spread true knowledge in this world and make you successful in hereafter Ameen Khaksar Karim Khan

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